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Arizona Pioneer & Cemetery Research Project

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Version 082807

Update Version 123011

 

MIDDLETON RANCH GRAVES/CEMETERY

By: Richard Pierce

8/23/07

Approx. Location N34 01.368, W110 49.310 (elev. 5,547)


Some photographs around the Middleton Ranch where four are buried. They put up a small monument to the two killed in 1887, Hamp Blevins and John Payne and at the same time some of the group laid up some stones around the tree to make people think that was the grave site.

Stanley C. Brown, ex historian from Payson, now living in Prescott claims that both men killed by the September 3, 1881 Nan-tio-tish raid are also buried there. This is a hard place to get to, and is pretty desolate.

In July 10, 1882 Nan-tio-tish attacked the same ranch but no one was killed, the Globe Irregular Rangers had arrived early on July 10th and were napping in the yard when the attach started, they and the Middleton's lost all their horses to the Apaches in a fight that lasted several hours and withdrew up the valley of Wilson Creek towards the Q ranch (way before there was a Q ranch in Arizona).

The two buried from the September 3, 1881 Nan-tio-tish raid are Geo. Turner and Henry Moody... to do this one right might need a two - three day trip, I like three days cause going is tuff and if I stay a while I feel better about it!

Have a good day!

 

Dick

 

Photograph courtesy: Richard Pierce

 

Photograph courtesy: Richard Pierce

 

 

Photograph courtesy: Richard Pierce

 

 

Photograph courtesy: Richard Pierce

 

 

Photograph courtesy: Richard Pierce

The Silver Belt

(local Globe, AZ newspaper) story of the 1881 Apache attack:

 

On September 3, 1881, two young men came to the Middleton Ranch, W. F. “Henry“ Moody and George Turner, to warn the Middleton's of an Apache uprising. After listening to their story, William had decided that there was no immediate danger and they continued with their daily routine. “The family consisted of William Middleton aged 55 years, his wife, his son Henry aged 24, his daughter Miss Hattie aged 17, and some small children.”

 

About 2:30 in the afternoon a group of about seven Apaches came to the ranch. They appeared friendly and were supposed to be scouts, they were well armed. They asked for and received food. When questioned about the uprising, they said it was a lie.

 

“The young men and Miss Hattie were seated at the door of the house conversing with each other, when at once the Indians sounded their war whoop and fired, killing Turner & Moody who were unarmed and unsuspecting, instantly.  They shot at William Middleton, a bullet passed through his hat, and another grazed his shoulder causing a slight wound.  They then ran to a bank about 50 yards from the house, and hid in the bushes.   While they were retreating Henry Middleton ran into the front yard and shot the Indian dead, who had killed Moody.  He fired again and probably hit another.  At the third shot he received a bullet through his shoulder a little above the heart.  Whereupon the family all got into the house & barricaded it. 

 

 

 

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