HOME | BOOSTER | CEMETERIES | EDUCATION | GHOST TOWNS | HEADSTONE 

MINOTTO | PICTURES | ROADS | JACK SWILLING | TEN DAY TRAMPS

 

Arizona Pioneer & Cemetery Research Project

Internet Presentation

Version 111207A

 

 

PINAL CEMETERY

 

Table of Contents

Click hyperlinks in BLUE to go directly to subject

 

PINAL CITY CEMETERY RESEARCH. 6

Map to Pinal and Silver King Cemeteries. 9

PINAL CITY CEMETERY. 10

SUPERIOR, ARIZONA. 11

 

Link to Richard Pierce’s excellent website reviewing this outing at:

http://www.dickpierce.com/Silver/

 

Figure 1

Photograph Courtesy: Jim Blaugh

 

It is great that the Arizona Pioneer & Cemetery Research Project is interested in these cemeteries, since there are maybe a hundred buried at Pinal City Cemetery and 25 at the Silver King Cemetery.

 

 

Figure 2

Pinal Cemetery

Photo Courtesy: Richard Pierce

 

Figure 3

Picketpost Mountain - Ceilia Anne Earp Grave

Photo Courtesy: Jim Blaugh

 

Figure 4

Annie Marie Weston’s Grave – Pinal Cemetery

Photo Courtesy: Jim Blaugh

 

Such notables as Charles Mallet Dobbie, killed by the Apache Kid at 13 years, John Middleton progenitor of that family, and perhaps his grandson-in-law and the ever famous Celia Ann Blaylock, aka Mattie Earp, (Figure 1) Wyatt's middle wife is in the Pinal cemetery.

 

Figure 5

Photo Courtesy: Jim Blaugh

 

It would be a great place to dowse since only about 10 or 12 graves are marked in the Pinal Cemetery and 3 - 4 are marked in the Silver King Cemetery. One in the Silver King has a great tombstone, I will attach if I can find it...

 

Figure 6

Photo Courtesy: Jim Blaugh

 

Pinal City according to some had as many as 2,000 inhabitants at one point as it was the smelter for the Silver King mine 6 miles away. The Silver King road, between Pinal City and the mine is still there in places. It runs near the Pinal Cemetery, too. There are places in the caliches where you can see the wagon ruts made by the ore wagons coming from the mine to the smelter... neat place, but much neater when cooler.

 

Figure 7

Photo Courtesy: Richard Pierce

 

Nan-tio-tish raided off the Ft. Apache reservation, right on the heels of the Cibique battle, one stop was made at the Middleton Ranch 8 miles SE of Young where they killed two young men and wounded another in 1881. As Hattie Middleton latter wrote "Two young friends from Globe, W. F. Henry Moody and George Turner, were on a visit." Both were killed and some say buried at the ranch. Later in 1887 during the Graham/Tewksbury feud, 6 men rode up to the same ranch and a shooting started, 2 dead 2 wounded and 2 escaped clean. The next day a party from Young buried the dead again at the Middleton ranch... So 4 buried and the graves are not known yet by modern folks... that would be a trip all by itself, they have a motel of sorts in Young, nice place to stay

 

PS - Pinal City was once known as Picketpost since General Stoneman had an extended camp there during the early Apache Wars.

 

Jack San Felice is an acquaintance, and he wrote "When Silver was King" about the Silver King Mine and on page 123 he has a bunch of info on who is buried in the Silver King Cemetery.

 

Arizona Pioneer & Cemetery Research Project

Internet Presentation

Version 111207A

PINAL CITY CEMETERY RESEARCH

A.K.A. PINAL CITY BURIAL GROUNDS

November 10, 2007

By: Neal Du Shane

 

Figure 8

 

Pinal City Cemetery is one of the historic Pioneer Cemeteries that is being reclaimed by Mother Nature. The term “In a state of arrested decay” doesn’t apply to this cemetery. Brush, cacti, weeds are all reclaiming these graves.

 

Figure 9

Photo by: Neal Du Shane

 

This Historic Pioneer Cemetery is unprotected by any type of fence enclosure. Cattle and wild life roam the cemetery and are strewing evidence of graves. This would be an excellent project for a FFA, 4-H or church group – in fact any interested group to restore this cemetery or at least halt the decay process. APCRP would be happy to assist any restoration project by identifying all the graves. Do you know any group that would like to ADOPT this cemetery as a worthy project? Let’s talk this up and see if we can’t get some interest to restore and maintain this beautiful cemetery.

 

One of the first and most obvious graves when you pull up to the Pinal City Cemetery is that of Celia Blaylock Earp. Shana Cardenas indicated there was a rumor that the marker was only a memorial and that her remains were actually buried somewhere else. Thus was the starting point for our research. After researching this grave with four different methods it was determined it is our belief that all indications are that she is buried at this marker. Interesting to note that there is a child buried within two feet of the foot of her grave. Laying in a NW direction at the base of Celia Blaylock Earp’s grave. APCRP is not implying this has anything to do with anything other than a child’s grave.

 

At the request of Dick Pierce we were able to find the graves of John Middleton and William Henry Willy. Currently both are unidentified and lay under a growth of cactus.

 

Kevin Hart took a rod, we branched out and we walked the general area in all directions. It was found there are graves in a 500’ area from the main graves of Celia Blaylock Earp. Brush and cactus are the main obstacles in identifying these Pioneer’s Graves. Without placing markers on each unidentified grave we are estimating there would be from 100 to 200 graves here.

 

Figure 10

 

Many of the graves are clustered indicating possible family graves. Some groups of graves numbering from two or three in a group, to eight to twelve in a group.

 

Children and female graves account for approximately one half the graves we found. Adult male graves account for the remainder.

 

Some graves are identified with headstones or some type of marker. Others are identified with rocks outlining the grave with no identification as to the name of the person buried there. Others are barely identified with a group of one or two rocks. Many are identified by a bush or cactus - a few have imploded with only a depression in the earth. Basically stating there are far more graves at this cemetery than previously indicated.

 

Map to Pinal and Silver King Cemeteries

Figure 11

 

Figure 12

 

Arizona Pioneer & Cemetery Research Project

Internet Presentation

Version 111207A

 

PINAL CITY CEMETERY

A.K.A. PINAL CITY BURIAL GROUNDS

November 10, 2007

By: Neal Du Shane

 

Pinal City Cemetery is one of the historic Pioneer Cemeteries that is being reclaimed by Mother Nature. The term “In a state of arrested decay” doesn’t apply to this cemetery. Brush, cacti, weeds are all reclaiming these graves.

 

This Historic Pioneer Cemetery is unprotected by any type of fence enclosure. Cattle and wild life roam the cemetery and are strewing evidence of graves. This would be an excellent project for a FFA, 4-H or church group – in fact any interested group to restore this cemetery or at least halt the decay process. APCRP would be happy to assist any restoration project by identifying all the graves. Do you know any group that would like to ADOPT this cemetery as a worthy project? Let’s talk this up and see if we can’t get some interest to restore and maintain this beautiful cemetery.

 

One of the first and most obvious graves when you pull up to the Pinal City Cemetery is that of Celia Blaylock Earp. Shana Cardenas indicated there was a rumor that the marker was only a memorial and that her remains were actually buried somewhere else. Thus was the starting point for our research. After researching this grave with four different methods it was determined it is our belief that all indications are that she is buried at this marker. Interesting to note that there is a child buried within two feet of the foot of her grave. Laying in a NW direction at the base of Celia Blaylock Earp’s grave. APCRP is not implying this has anything to do with anything other than a child’s grave.

 

At the request of Dick Pierce we were able to find the graves of John Middleton and William Henry Willy. Currently both are unidentified and lay under a growth of cactus.

 

Kevin Hart grabbed a rod and we walked the general area in all directions. It was found there are graves in a 500’ area from the main graves of Celia Blaylock Earp. Brush and cactus are the main obstacles in identifying these Pioneer’s Graves. Without placing markers on each unidentified grave we are estimating there would be from 100 to 200 graves here.

 

Many of the graves are clustered indicating possible family graves. Some groups of graves numbering from two or three in a group, to eight to twelve in a group.

 

Children and female graves account for approximately one half the graves we found. Adult male graves account for the remainder.

 

Some graves are identified with headstones or some type of marker. Others are identified with rocks outlining the grave with no identification as to the name of the person buried there. Others are barely identified with a group of one or two rocks. Many are identified by a bush or cactus - a few have imploded with only a depression in the earth. Basically stating there are far more graves at this cemetery than previously indicated.

 

SUPERIOR, ARIZONA

 

Prior to visiting the Pinal cemetery, I arrived early in Superior, Arizona just before sunrise. Being an historian and a former market evaluation professional for a national hardware wholesaler, my old training kicked in.

 

Driving off the current beaten path to downtown Superior was a voyage into history. The downtown area is abandoned with the exception of approximately three businesses. As I stood in the middle of the street to take a picture you would hear the hustle and bustle of years gone by. Laughter, conversation of current events, hustle and bustle of everyday activity, and I’m sure a gun shot or two echoed down the street in the early morning. I could only imagine the activity this downtown community once generated when this was an active and prosperous mining community.

 

Figure 13

Downtown Superior, AZ 11/10/07 Photo by: Neal Du Shane

 

Driving off the current beaten path to downtown Superior was a voyage into history. The downtown area is abandoned with the exception of approximately three businesses. As I stood in the middle of the street to take a picture you would hear the hustle and bustle of years gone by. Laughter, conversation of current events, hustle and bustle of everyday activity, and I’m sure a gun shot or two echoed down the street in the early morning. I could only imagine the activity this downtown community once generated when this was an active and prosperous mining community.

 

Figure 14

Downtown Superior, Arizona 11/10/2007 Photo by: Neal Du Shane

 

 

Arizona Pioneer & Cemetery Research Project

Internet Presentation

Version 111207A

 

WebMaster: Neal Du Shane

 

n.j.dushane@comcast.net

 

Link to Richard Pierce’s excellent website detailing this outing at:

 http://www.dickpierce.com/Silver/

 

 

Copyright ©2003-2007 Neal Du Shane
 All rights reserved.
Information contained within this website may be used
 for personal family history purposes, but not for financial profit of any kind.
 All contents of this website are willed to the Arizona Pioneer & Cemetery Research Project (
APCRP).

HOME | BOOSTER | CEMETERIES | EDUCATION | GHOST TOWNS | HEADSTONE 

MINOTTO | PICTURES | ROADS | JACK SWILLING | TEN DAY TRAMPS