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Arizona Pioneer & Cemetery Research Project

Internet Publication

Version 110109-2

 

WINCHESTER, ARIZONA

and the

DESERT QUEEN MINE

Researched by: Bonnie Helten, Cindy Enos, Mary Ann Wunderlin

 

Photo Courtesy; Bonnie Helten, Cindy Enos, Mary Ann Wunderlin

 

The Desert Queen Mine property consists of three Patented Mining Claims:

 

1.     The Golden Mound

2.     The Gold Eagle

3.     The Safe Deposit

 

Located 120 miles North West of Phoenix and 2.5 miles North of Vicksburg, Arizona, The Desert Queen Mine stopped production of GOLD in 1942 when the United States Government no longer allowed mining of non-strategic minerals or gold during World War 2.

 

There is a well on the property which was a main watering site for travelers to the North as well as for the mine. The Grandfather Water Rights are outside the Gila River System and source.

 

The Winchester Home still remains intact named after the original owner JOSIAH WINCHESTER. The old mine shack still standing is in poor repair. The Old Miner's Shower has been torn down but there are several foundations including what may be the remains of an old stamp mill with minor tailings.

 

Photo Courtesy; Bonnie Helten, Cindy Enos, Mary Ann Wunderlin

 

Old loading bin by "main level" is in good shape and still usable. Two loading chutes (slides) on property are in disrepair, but could easily be put into working order. Access roads are in excellent condition. A 500 Gallon cement water tank is in good shape.

 

Results of findings and tests conducted by Kappes, Cassiday & Associates & Geology Students at Arizona State University; supervised by Faculty concluded that; values of the ore vary and sample values are listed for Gold, Silver, Copper and other minerals.

 

Two twenty pound average samples from the approximately 6,000 ton ore tailings dump of already mined ore were sent to see if the Gold from the ore dump could be leached successfully by the Cyanide method. This was not in use when former owners worked the mine back in the early 1900's. The miners then only dug for visionary Gold veins and dumped the tailings outside as they worked. Findings: Approximately 90% of Gold and 80% of the Silver could be extracted from the ore using the Cyanide method.



Map by: Neal Du Shane

 

2.5 Miles From Vicksburg 6,000 Ton Ore Dump Gold, Silver, Copper & Other Minerals Grandfathered Water Rights, Old Winchester Home On Property, Over 50+ Acres Two Adit’s, well maintained ingress/egress

 

Two separate graves sites were identified totaling approximately 100 graves combined between the two sites. Historical information has not been found to document the names of the interred.


History of the Ghost Town of Winchester

  

Remains of Winchester House

Photo Courtesy; Bonnie Helten, Cindy Enos, Mary Ann Wunderlin


The town of Winchester is possibly the most well-established, shortest-lived mining town in Arizona’s history.

 

Winchester was founded by Josiah Winchester, whose mining home remains (although in poor repair) on the Desert Queen Mine property.

Nearby Vicksburg was named after Victor Satterdahl, a storekeeper in the 1890s who set up a post office in his store in 1906. Wells Fargo had a stage station in Vicksburg in 1907. Josiah Winchester owned the Desert Queen Mine and patented it in 1911, and founded the short lived town of Winchester.

Map by: Neal Du Shane

 

Dick Wick Hall helped the founding by setting off a major rush to the region. He did this by announcing his gold assay returns on the streets of Phoenix in 1909. His returns were between $117,000 and $338,000 per ton of ore. Gold was then at $32.00 per oz. or less.

Winchester boomed, approaching a population of 2000 people the first month. The town boasted 2 restaurants, a saloon, an accommodation house, various stores and a telephone line to Vicksburg. Through scandalous promotion, Josiah Winchester, through zealous promotion, sold $2,500 worth of lots the first day of sale. Winchester was soon the largest settlement on the Arizona and California Railroad.

After two months the gold was said to have run out and the despondent residents of Winchester departed leaving behind a ghost town. Josiah’s home is the most significant remains of the ghost town, but there are several foundations remaining on the property.

 

Photo Courtesy; Bonnie Helten, Cindy Enos, Mary Ann Wunderlin

 

Research identified what we think may have been the Winchester Cemetery with interments totaling approximately 20 graves.

This claim is for sale, 50+ Acres, Reported Price: $1.95 Million, 10/31/09

 

Arizona Pioneer & Cemetery Research Project

Internet Publication

Version 110109-2

 

WebMaster: Neal Du Shane

 

n.j.dushane@comcast.net

 

Copyright © 2009 Neal Du Shane
All rights reserved. Information contained within this website may be used
for personal family history purposes, but not for financial profit or gain.
All contents of this website are willed to the Arizona Pioneer & Cemetery Research Project (
APCRP).

 

HOME | BOOSTER | CEMETERIES | EDUCATION | GHOST TOWNS | HEADSTONE 

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